Sunday with a Scientist to explore fashion-forward technology

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Sunday with a Scientist to explore fashion-forward technology

Brad Barker, right, Jennifer Melander, Carl Nelson and Michelle Krehbiel show off examples of wearable tech that are designed by 4-H students using micro-controllers.
Craig Chandler | University Communications
Brad Barker, right, Jennifer Melander, Carl Nelson and Michelle Krehbiel show off examples of wearable tech that are designed by 4-H students using micro-controllers.

The University of Nebraska State Museum's first Sunday with a Scientist program of 2016 for children and families will investigate "wearable technology" and e-textiles that incorporate conductive fibers or elements directly into the material. The program will take place from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Jan. 17 at Morrill Hall, south of 14th and Vine streets.

In cooperation with the Nebraska 4-H Wearable Technologies project, Brad Barker, University of Nebraska-Lincoln 4H/extension science and technology specialist; Gwen Nugent, research professor in the Nebraska Center for Research on Children, Youth, Families and Schools; Neal Grandgenett, University of Nebraska at Omaha STEM outreach coordinator supervisor; and Jennifer Keshwani, extension assistant professor and biomedical engineer, will lead visitors in activities to explore the foundations of wearable technologies through the engineering design process, circuitry and computer programming.

Children can make a light-up wearable hair bow or bowtie, create an electronic card with a "paper circuit," use alligator clips to light LEDs, make a "squishy" circuit using conductive dough and explore the coding of simple components that make a light-sensor guitar.

The Nebraska 4-H Wearable Technologies project is a collaboration between the University of Nebraska and SparkFun Electronics, funded by the National Science Foundation.

Sunday with a Scientist is a series of presentations that highlight the work of scientists, while educating children and families on a variety of topics related to science and natural history. Presenters share scientific information in a fun, informal way through demonstrations, activities or by conducting science on site. Sunday with a Scientist typically takes place from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on the third Sunday of each month. For more information on the program, including upcoming topics, go to http://www.museum.unl.edu.

Established in 1871, the University of Nebraska State Museum is the state's premier museum of natural history. The museum is focused on promoting discovery in natural science, fostering scientific understanding and interpretation of the Earth's past, present and future and enhancing stewardship of the natural and cultural heritage of Nebraska through world-class exhibits, collections and special events.