Geological Society of America meeting is April 24-25

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Geological Society of America meeting is April 24-25

The north-central section meeting of the Geological Society of America will take place on April 24-25 in Lincoln. Several representatives from UNL's School of Natural Resources and the Conservation and Survey Division are involved with the two-day event.
The north-central section meeting of the Geological Society of America will take place on April 24-25 in Lincoln. Several representatives from UNL's School of Natural Resources and the Conservation and Survey Division are involved with the two-day event.

The north-central section meeting of the Geological Society of America will take place on April 24-25 in Lincoln. Several representatives from UNL's School of Natural Resources and the Conservation and Survey Division are involved with the two-day event.

"The meeting covers all aspects of geology, paleontology, geohydrology and allied Earth sciences, as well as the history and philosophy of geology as a science," said Matt Joeckel, professor and geologist. "Most of the presentations will be research-oriented. Some will deal with geosciences education and some will deal with other aspects of the Earth sciences."

Geoscientists from the north-central United States and beyond will descend upon Lincoln to discuss new and existing science, and to explore the unique geological and historic features of the region, which covers Ohio to Nebraska and Missouri to Manitoba, Canada.

"We anticipate 350 attendees, so the meeting is bigger than many local to regional meetings," Joeckel said.

The meeting's highlights include four in-state field trips, a performance of the musical composition "Ashfall" by a Nebraska Chamber Orchestra ensemble and a keynote address by Kirk Johnson, Sant Director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.

Joeckel is serving as chair of the event. Other committee positions are held by Dana Divine, survey hydrogeologist; Paul Hanson, SNR associate director; Jesse Korus, survey geologist; and Mark Kuzila, professor and director of the Conservation and Survey Division.

"There are some really excellent sessions planned for the meeting," Hanson said. "One session will address the geology of carbonatites, which is of direct interest to those interested in the natural resources in Nebraska. The Elk Creek carbonatite will possibly be mined in the future in southeastern Nebraska, and this session should give a good background on the current state of understanding of this unique resource."

The meeting will shine the spotlight on not only Nebraska and its natural resources, but also on the role that the university plays in fostering Earth sciences research and education.

"It allows many of us in CSD to present research results relevant to the geology and groundwater resources of Nebraska," Joeckel said. "The last time this meeting came to Lincoln was 19 years ago, so it is a rare opportunity to showcase the university and the Earth sciences research and education done here."

To learn more about the upcoming meeting and the GSA, visit http://go.unl.edu/9okm.

— Mekita Rivas, Natural Resources