Podcast to interview artist Tiffany Chung live at Sheldon

· 2 min read

Podcast to interview artist Tiffany Chung live at Sheldon

Multimedia artist Tiffany Chung
Multimedia artist Tiffany Chung

Multimedia artist Tiffany Chung will be interviewed by Tyler Green, host of “The Modern Art Notes Podcast,” at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 25 at Sheldon Museum of Art. The live taping of the podcast is free and open to the public.

Chung is one of three artists featured in the Sheldon exhibition “Unquiet Harmony: The Subject of Displacement.” She is noted for her cartographic drawings, sculptures, videos, photographs, and theater performances that examine migration, urban progress, and environmental impact in relation to history and cultural memory. As an artist who is active internationally, she presented “Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past Is Prologue,” a major solo exhibition this year at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The works by Chung on view at Sheldon offer an investigation into human’s fraught relationship with the environment, the destruction that can be wrought on the land, and the resultant displacement of farmers. Through the use of four embroidered charts, 15 works on paper, a sculptural installation, and two videos, Chung references the past and fictionalizes the future in a nonlinear manner, collapsing the distinctions between time and geography to draw parallels between the toll of the 1930s Dust Bowl on the Great Plains and the decline of other small agricultural and industrial towns around the world.

Green is a historian, critic, and the host of “The Modern Art Notes Podcast,” a weekly interview program that has aired over 400 episodes. Green is also the author of “Carleton Watkins: Making the West American,” which won a 2019 California Book Award gold medal.

Chung and Green will also meet with students while on campus.

Green will present a talk on his first book, “Carleton Watkins: Making the West American” (University of California Press 2018), at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 26 in Sheldon’s Ethel S. Abbott Auditorium. The talk, which is free and open to the public, has been scheduled especially for students in Landscape Architecture 241.