Hoy earns honor for supporting students

· 2 min read

Hoy earns honor for supporting students

Roger Hoy (from left), Caleb Lindhorst and Luke Prosser show off a tractor designed by students for a 2014 engineering competition. Lindhorst was involved in a December 2013 auto accident and support from Hoy and Prosser has helped him return to classes at UNL.
Troy Fedderson | University Communications
Roger Hoy (from left), Caleb Lindhorst and Luke Prosser show off a tractor designed by students for a 2014 engineering competition. Lindhorst was involved in a December 2013 auto accident and support from Hoy and Prosser has helped him return to classes on campus. For his work supporting Lindhorst and other students, Hoy has received the James V. Griesen Exemplary Service to Students Award.

Roger Hoy, professor of biological systems engineering, has received the University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s James V. Griesen Exemplary Service to Students Award.

Presented by Student Affairs, the annual honor was established in 1986 as the Chancellor’s Exemplary Service to Students award. It was renamed in 2006 to honor Griesen’s service to students. Griesen retired as vice chancellor for student affairs on July 30, 2006. He continued to work as a professor in educational administration and is now an emeritus professor. The award recognizes extraordinary and sustained performance by individuals serving Nebraska students.

Hoy earned the honor for his work mentoring and teaching students as a faculty member and director of the Nebraska Tractor Test Laboratory.

His dedication is reflected in how Hoy mentored student Caleb Lindhorst, who was involved in a life-altering car accident. Doctors were unsure if Lindhorst would ever be able to continue to pursue a bachelor’s degree.

Hoy spent time in the hospital helping Lindhorst stay current in his courses. Hoy also designed an entire curriculum for Lindhorst to follow.

Lindhorst not only succeeded, but is on track to graduate this year with a master’s degree in agricultural and biological systems engineering.

“Dr. Hoy doesn’t consider his assistance to Caleb to be extraordinary, but that is exactly what Dr. Hoy’s service to each and every student in (biological systems engineering) is: extraordinary,” Hoy’s nomination letter said. “He would provide that level to service to any student who needs it, without question.”

Hoy also teaches agricultural engineering courses, advises undergraduates, is faculty mentor for the university’s chapter of the ASABE quarter-scale tractor design club, and supervised the department’s senior design course.

The award, which includes a stipend provided by the University of Nebraska Foundation via private funds, is presented during Honors Convocation.