Goddard to take on new role at Iowa

Goddard to take on new role at Iowa

Steve Goddard, who served as Nebraska's interim vice chancellor for research and economic development from 2016-1018, has been named dean of the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Nebraska's Steve Goddard, senior associate to the executive vice chancellor, chair and professor of computer science and engineering, has been named dean of the University of Iowa's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He starts in the new role June 1.

Since joining the University of Nebraska–Lincoln faculty in 1998, Goddard has served as the associate vice chancellor for research, interim vice chancellor for research and economic development, and interim dean of arts and sciences.

“Steve stepped in at critical moments in our campus history, both as interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and as interim vice chancellor for research and economic development,” said Donde Plowman, executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “He brought a great energy and focus to each of those campus leadership roles. He is a well-respected leader who will be missed.”

Goddard also served on the Chancellor’s Commission on the Status of Women, the ADVANCE-Nebraska Faculty Committee, the Faculty Senate’s Intercollegiate Athletics Committee, and a campuswide task force studying the potential role and impact of massive online open courses.

Goddard has served as a member of the board of directors for NUtech Ventures, the Nebraska Innovation Campus Development Corporation and the National Strategic Research Institute.

His research is focused on embedded, real-time and distributed computer systems with emphasis in cyber-physical systems and rate-based scheduling.

Before joining Nebraska, Goddard worked in the computer industry for 13 years, including nine as president of his own company. A Minnesota native, he received a bachelor’s degree in computer science and mathematics from the University of Minnesota in 1985 and earned his master's and doctoral degrees in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.