'Corpus Christi,' 'I Was at Home, But' open at the Ross

· 2 min read

'Corpus Christi,' 'I Was at Home, But' open at the Ross

Bartosz Bielenia stars in “Corpus Christi," a film which opens Feb. 28 at the Ross.
Courtesy
Bartosz Bielenia stars in “Corpus Christi," a film which opens Feb. 28 at the Ross.

Two new films – “Corpus Christi” and “I Was at Home, But” – open Feb. 28 at the Mary Riepma Ross Media Arts Center.

“Corpus Christi” examines questions of faith and redemption. After spending years in a Warsaw prison for a violent crime, 20-year-old Daniel is released and sent to a remote village to work as a manual laborer. The job is designed to keep the ex-con busy, but Daniel has a higher calling.

Over the course of his incarceration he has found Christ and aspires to join the clergy, but his criminal record means no seminary will accept him. When Daniel arrives in town, one quick lie allows him to be mistaken for the town’s new priest, and he sets about leading his newfound flock. Though he has no training, his passion and charisma inspire the community. At the same time, his unconventional sermons and unpriestly behavior raise suspicions among some of the townsfolk even more so as he edges towards a dark secret that the community hasn't revealed in the confessional booth.

“Corpus Christi,” which is not rated, shows through March 5.

Corpus Christi - Official U.S. Trailer
Trailer: "Corpus Christi"

Director by Angela Schnelec, “I Was at Home, But” tells the story of Astrid, a 40-something mother of two, struggling to regain her balance in the wake of her husband’s death. Her adolescent son, Phillip, disappeared for a week and has returned to face disciplinary action at school and his toe requires amputation. As new questions confront Astrid from every angle, even simple activities like buying a bicycle or engaging with a work of art, are fraught with unexpected challenges.

In her signature elliptical style and with a gentle sense of humor, Schanelec weaves together these narrative strands and more — a school production of "Hamlet," a pair of teachers deciding whether to start a family, a donkey and a dog who share a home — to create an indelible picture of a small community grappling with fundamental questions of existence.

Marco Abel, chair and professor of English, will lead a movie talk following the 5:15 p.m. March 3 screening.

“I Was at Home, But,” which is not rated, shows through March 5.

Trailer: "I Was at Home, But"

For more information, including show times, call 402-472-5353 or visit the Ross website.