First Peoples of the Plains lecture is Oct. 1

First Peoples of the Plains lecture is Oct. 1

Marcy Gilbert (left) and Madonna Thunder Hawk (right) with Dr. Elizabeth Castle and Christina D. King will present "Indigenous Women Behind and in Front of the Camera: The Making of 'Warrior Women'" for the third annual Hubbard Lecture Oct. 1.
Marcy Gilbert (left) and Madonna Thunder Hawk (right) with Dr. Elizabeth Castle and Christina D. King will present "Indigenous Women Behind and in Front of the Camera: The Making of 'Warrior Women'" for the third annual Hubbard Lecture Oct. 1.

The University of Nebraska State Museum welcomes filmmakers Dr. Elizabeth A. Castle and Christina D. King with Marcy Gilbert and Madonna Thunder Hawk for the third annual Claire M. Hubbard First Peoples of the Plains Lecture on Oct. 1 at the Sheldon Museum of Art.

"Warrior Women" is the untold story of mothers and daughters fighting for civil rights in the American Indian Movement of the 1970s. The film unveils not only a woman's perspective of history, but also examines the impact political struggles have on the children who bear witness. The 2015 Hubbard Lecture provides a glimpse into the making of this powerful film from both behind and in front of the camera.

Castle, King, Gilbert and Thunder Hawk will deliver their presentation beginning at 6 p.m. in the Ethel S. Abbott Auditorium of the Sheldon Museum of Art, 12th and R streets. The four will present clips paired with their personal experiences from the documentary. The Oct. 1 event will be celebrated with a free public reception in Sheldon's Great Hall prior to the lecture at 5 p.m.

The University of Nebraska State Museum, in partnership with Vision Maker Media, UNL Women's Center and the Sheldon Museum of Art, present the reception and lecture to help advance the understanding and appreciation of the cultural heritage of the First Peoples of the Plains. The lecture series is made possible by generous contributions from Dr. Anne M. Hubbard, the Claire M. Hubbard Foundation and the Cooper Foundation.

"We are very grateful to Anne M. Hubbard, M.D., and the Claire M. Hubbard Foundation for endowing the museum's Hubbard Lecture series to help advance the understanding and appreciation of the cultural heritage of the First Peoples of the Great Plains," said retiring NU State Museum Director Priscilla Grew. "On Oct. 1 we will also be welcoming our new museum director, Susan Weller. It will be the first day on the job for Susan, who comes to Nebraska from her former position as director of the Bell Museum of Natural History at the University of Minnesota."

In her first documentary, Dr. Elizabeth Castle brings 15 years of experience as a scholar, activist and oral historian working in collaboration with indigenous communities. She has taught ethnic and native studies at UC Berkeley, Stanford and the University of South Dakota and has been on the staff of President Clinton's Initiative on Race.

Oklahoma-born Christina D. King (Creek/Seminole) is a producer and filmmaker whose work spans commercials, documentaries, film and television with a focus on human rights issues, civic engagement through storytelling and democratizing filmmaker opportunities for minority voices.

Madonna Thunder Hawk (Two Kettle Lakota) has spoken throughout the United States, Central America, Europe and the Middle East and is a longtime community organizer with a range of experience in American Indian treaty rights protection, cultural preservation, economic development and environmental justice.

Marcy Gilbert (Madonna's daughter) has a master's degree in nutrition and is a community development field specialist for South Dakota State University Extension. She works with native communities and youth in providing education and awareness of the importance of physical activity and the reintroduction of native foods to maintain health and fight diabetes.