'Cairns Uncovered' premieres April 10

'Cairns Uncovered' premieres April 10

Researchers (from left) Elizabeth Howard, Mike Chondoronek and Ralph Hartley record initial observations of an Alaskan alpine cairn.
Peter Stegen | Courtesy
Researchers (from left) Elizabeth Howard, Mike Chondoronek and Ralph Hartley record initial observations of an Alaskan alpine cairn.

The work of an interdisciplinary team led by UNL anthropologists is featured in "Cairns Uncovered," a video that premieres at 7 p.m. April 10 in Richards Hall, room 15.

In the summer of 2013, the team — which included William Hunt and Ralph Hartley, adjunct faculty in anthropology — studied prehistoric cairns on a remote mountain top on Baranof Island, Alaska. The research, funded by the National Science Foundation, sought to determine when the large cairns (artificial piles of rocks) were created, why they were built and how they were used.

The video, filmed and produced by Peter Stegen, a videographer and production associate at NET, examines the cairns from scientific, spiritual, academic and cultural perspectives. Commentary is provided by Kirk Dombrowski, professor of sociology, and Martha McCollough, associate professor of anthropology and ethnic studies.

The "Cairns Uncovered" premiere will include presentations by Hunt and Stegen. The video and discussion are free and open to the public.